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OTHER PROJECTS

 

A unique live cinematic and musical event, Tales from the Gimli Hospital: Reframed pairs acclaimed filmmaker Guy Maddin’s classic first feature film with a live performance—directed by Maddin himself—of a new score created by composer Matthew Patton, a superstar group of Icelandic musicians, acclaimed Seattle-based musical collective Aono Jikken Ensemble, and live electronics engineer Paul Corley. A cult sensation when it was released theatrically in 1988, the original Tales from the Gimli Hospital tells the dreamlike, elliptical story of the jealousy and madness instilled in two men sharing a hospital room in a remote Canadian village. The film first propelled Maddin to international prominence, becoming a success on the midnight movie circuit, and is now being completely transformed by this brand new performance.

Xavier Le Roy's premise begins with a study of the expressive "choreography" of Sir Simon Rattle's conducting style, which Le Roy used as the structure for an evening-length performance of Sacre du Printemps. Le Roy recreated and elaborated on the conductor's movements on stage using the documentary film "Rhythm is It!," which features Rattle conducting "The Rite of Spring" by Igor Stravinsky. The piece was performed by Le Roy, accompanied by an audio playback arrangement which isolates each instrument in the orchestra and created the sensation that each audience member could be a musician in the orchestra, therein turning audience into virtual orchestra and dancer into "conductor."

Eyebeam and PERFORMA05, in association with HIGHBROW, co-presented Screen Play by visual artist and composer Christian Marclay, consisting of a video and three live musical ensembles. Marclay created the video to serve as a score to be interpreted live by a series of invited ensembles.

Marclay was the recipient of the 2005 Moving Image Commission, creating the video score Screen Play in Eyebeam’s Production Studios. The projected element of Screen Play is a combination of found film footage overlaid with computer animation. Marclay chose footage suggesting certain visual rhythms and emotions, which he then worked to accentuate or underscore elements with overlapping computer graphics. The resulting video—reminiscent at moments of a silent film and at others of a flight simulator—becomes the visual score for musicians to interpret live.

 

HIGHBROW is very proud to be a sponsor of The Tournées Festival, a program of FACE, which aims to bring contemporary French cinema to American college and university campuses. The program distributes over $200,000 in grants annually to encourage schools to begin their own self-sustaining French film festivals. The Tournées Festival has partnered with more than 300 universities, making it possible for more than 450,000 students to discover French-language films.
The festival offers a wide variety of films that represent the best of contemporary French cinema. The films span generational and geographic borders, offer a range of genres and subjects, and showcase innovations in both style and storytelling. There are films by first-time directors alongside those from respected and revered fixtures in French cinema.

The Ohmies is an interactive musical health and wellness brand for children three to five years old.
Through The Ohmies, preschoolers will interact with a musical adventure based on a curriculum focusing on movement/physical activity, emotional development and social development. Children will learn to identify their feelings, make friends, resolve conflicts, get along with their siblings, and to deal with anxiety. Moreover, The Ohmies will focus on movement (and physical activity) as another basis for a healthy lifestyle.
The series features Penny Butterfly (age 7) and her little brother, Poogle Caterpillar (age 4), two spirited, fun-loving creatures who live in Ohmland and allow their curiosity to send them off on adventures. On every adventure, Penny and Poogle gain skills central to preschoolers, learning about themselves and the world around them. These skills will focus on helping preschoolers to develop positive skills for health and well-being.